2 Ounces of Organic Hopi Blue Corn-Grown very well in most USDA Zones, great change from your standard yellow corns. Sweet and succulent
2 Ounces of Organic Hopi Blue Corn-Grown very well in most USDA Zones, great change from your standard yellow corns. Sweet and succulent

2 Ounces of Organic Hopi Blue Corn-Grown very well in most USDA Zones, great change from your standard yellow corns. Sweet and succulent

Regular price
$5.99
Sale price
$5.99

Hopi Blue Corn - 2 Ounces
Zea mays
Sky Corn, Storm Corn, Hopi Corn, Indian Corn, Mesa Corn, Pueblo Corn
Description: Widely considered a staple corn of the Hopi people, this corn can be eaten as a sweet corn when young, or allowed to dry it can be used to make flour.
Height: 10-12 ft. (Blue corn also tends to produce more than one stalk (tiller) per plant)
Spacing: 6-9 in.
Ears per Stalk: 4 to 8 (May be more or less depending on soil, sun, water, and other conditions.)
Ear Length: 10 to 13 inches
Ear Weight: 7 to 10 ounces
Resistance: Wind & Drought
Days to Maturity: 88 to 92 days
Kernel Color: Red
Soil pH: 6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
Characteristics: Blue corn has a coarser, sweeter and nuttier taste than other types of flour corns. It is the basis for many traditional Native American foods. Most blue corns grown in the Southwest are typically flour corns. Kernels are made up of almost all soft, floury endosperm covered by a thin, evenly distributed layer of hard, corneous endosperm. The outer endosperm is made up of a single layer of cells containing blue pigment, and is called the aleurone layer. A thin, transparent layer of crushed cells called the pericarp covers the entire kernel and serves and the seed coat. Pigmentation can occur in the pericarp and the main body of the endosperm, but the blue associated with the blue corn is normally found in the aleurone layer. The small blue aleurone grains in this layer can become so dense that kernels appear to be black. The shape of the kernel is highly variable. Shape can range from small, flint-type kernels to large hominy types.
Information: 88 days. [Introduced about 1845. Originally from Virginia. This is the original 'Bloody Butcher'. Stalks grow 10 to 12' tall producing 4-8 ears per stalk. Kernels are deep blue with light blue stripes, and occasional white or light blue kernels. Use for flour, cereal, or roasting ears. Withstands heavy winds, drought and heat.
History: In Native American lore, maize (or corn as it is commonly called in the U.S.) was one of the "three sisters". Along with beans and squash, the three sisters were planted and grown together, supporting each other in their lifecycle and providing a very balanced diet of carbohydrates, proteins and vegetable fats to their cultivators.
Native American corn was the genetic foundation of all other corn varieties. "Indian" corn is rarely grown in the garden today. Columbus was one of the first Europeans to see maize or corn. The Pueblo Indians were raising irrigated corn in the American Southwest when Coronado visited in 1540. The settlers at Jamestown were taught how to raise it in 1608 and in 1620, it helped to keep the Pilgrims alive over winter. Corn cobs were found in Tehucan, Mexico that date back 7000 years. Most people now associate corn for eating with modern sweet corn varieties that incorporate specific genes to increase or enhance sugar quantities and shelf life. Other types of corn can be eaten like sweet corn when it is young, but are usually grown to maturity, dried and used for flour and meal.

Materials: 2 Ounces Organic Blue Hopi Corn