Common Boxwood Seeds - 15 Seeds - A very dense evergreen shrub for foundations and border. Very easily grown in all USDA Zones
Common Boxwood Seeds - 15 Seeds - A very dense evergreen shrub for foundations and border. Very easily grown in all USDA Zones

Common Boxwood Seeds - 15 Seeds - A very dense evergreen shrub for foundations and border. Very easily grown in all USDA Zones

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Common Boxwood
Buxus sempervirens
English Boxwood

Description: The boxwoods are profusely branched evergreen shrubs widely used in landscaping, especially for hedges and foundation plantings. There are some 70 species of boxwoods, but only two are commonly found in cultivation: this one and common boxwood (Buxus sempervirens). But those two species have given us hundreds of botanical varieties, horticultural cultivars and hybrids of garden origin to choose from. All the boxwoods have small, opposite, evergreen leaves.
USDA Zones: 4a – 10b
Heat Tolerance: Poorly adapted to the southwest USA, use the Japanese Boxwood instead
Sun Exposure: Full sun to light shade
Origin: Mediterranean region
Growth Habits: Evergreen tree or shrub, up to 30 feet tall (9 m)
pH: 6.1 to 7.8
Height: 24-48 inches
Spacing: 15 - 24 inches
Sun: The boxwoods, including littleleaf boxwood, do well in partial shade. Newly transplanted plants especially, should be protected from midday sun. Established boxwoods do fine in full sun up North, but should be positioned in partial shade in the South.
Moisture: Boxwoods have shallow roots, so they should be mulched well and watered when the soil gets dry, especially if positioned in full sun.
Danger: All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested
Bloom Color: Pale Green
Bloom Time: Mid Spring
Foliage: Grown for foliage, Evergreen, Blue-Green, Smooth-Textured
Other details: Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater
Discussion: The boxwoods are among the most common hedge plants, but they also can be used for almost any landscaping application. Individual plants or small groups, unpruned, make fine specimens in dappled shade; planted close together and pruned to a smooth, undulating surface, boxwoods make a striking ground cover; the small cultivars can be used in knot gardens or as edging around borders. Boxwoods are, of course, the quintessential foundation plant, used to hide home foundations in American suburbs throughout most of the United States Boxwoods are commonly used for topiary and they are well suited for bonsai. Littleleaf boxwood is especially well suited for shaping because its leaves are small and don't look ragged after trimming as do plants with larger leaves.

Materials: 15 Common Boxwood Seeds