Common Thorned Honey Locust-12 Seeds A Large Spiny Spreading Tree with enormous thorns along the trunk. Great for borders and edging areas
Common Thorned Honey Locust-12 Seeds A Large Spiny Spreading Tree with enormous thorns along the trunk. Great for borders and edging areas

Common Thorned Honey Locust-12 Seeds A Large Spiny Spreading Tree with enormous thorns along the trunk. Great for borders and edging areas

Regular price
$6.49
Sale price
$6.49

Common Honey Locust (Thorned)
Gleditsia triacanthos
Great Horned Locust, Honey Tree, Honey Locust, Sweet Locust, Thorny Locust, Sweet Bean Tree, Sweet Locust, Honey Shucks Locust

Description: Large, spiny tree with open, flattened crown of spreading branches.
Height 80' (24 m).
Diameter 2 1/2" (0.8 m).
Leaves pinnately and bipinnately compound; 4-8" (10-20 cm) long; the axis often with 3-6 pairs of side axes or forks; in late spring. Many oblong leaflets 3/8-1 1/4" (1-3 cm) long; paired and stalkless; with finely wavy edges. Shiny dark green above, dull yellow-green and nearly hairless beneath; turning yellow in autumn.
Bark gray-brown or black; fissured in long narrow scaly ridges; with stout brown spines, usually branched, sometimes 8" (20 cm) long, with 3 to many points.
Twigs shiny brown, stout, zigzag, with long spines.
Flowers 3/8" (10 mm) wide; bell-shaped, with 5 petals; greenish-yellow, covered with fine hairs; in short narrow clusters at leaf bases in late spring; usually male and female on separate twigs or trees.
Fruit 6-16" (15-41 cm) long, 1 1/4" (3 cm) wide; flat pod; dark brown, hairy, slightly curved and twisted, thick-walled; shedding unopened in late autumn; many beanlike flattened dark brown seeds in sweetish edible pulp.
Habitat Moist soils of river flood plains in mixed forests; sometimes on dry upland limestone hills; also in waste places.
Range Extreme S. Ontario to central Pennsylvania, south to NW. Florida, west to SE. Texas, and north to SE. South Dakota; naturalized eastward; to 2000' (610 m).
Discussion Livestock and wildlife consume the honey like, sweet pulp of the pods. Honey Locust is easily recognized by the large, branched spines on the trunk; thornless forms, however, are common in cultivation and are sometimes found wild. The spines have been used as pins. This hardy species is popular for shade, hedges, and attracting wildlife. It reaches heights of 30 meters and lives about 120 years. The tree is used in landscaping, in addition to being planted as avenue trees in cities. With its compound leaves, it casts a light shadow and is hence a superior lawn tree. Its long twisted fruit pod can be up to 50 centimeters long. An alcoholic liquid is obtained by fermenting the seed coat. The fruit is also a source of food for birds and mammals. Another characteristic feature of the honey-locust is the thorns on its branches. These thorns are dangerous when the tree is young. In the past, these hard thorns were used as nails. The honey-locust is very hardy in that it adapts well to many types of soils. It thrives best, however, on moist soils. Its reddish-brown wood is hard, strong and heavy. It resists humidity and decay, but is not very pliable. It is used in carpentry and for railway ties. These trees are very fast growing and very hardy. They tolerate air pollution well and a spineless variety (sometimes called the Moraine Locust) is often planted along city streets where there is a lot of pollution.

Materials: 12 Common Honey Locust Seeds