Organic Autumn Amber Raspberry Seeds - Thornless, Very Resistant to Soil-borne Disease

Organic Autumn Amber Raspberry Seeds - Thornless, Very Resistant to Soil-borne Disease

Regular price
$6.49
Sale price
$6.49

Organic Autumn Amber Raspberry
Rubus idaeus
Yellow Raspberry, Cream Raspberry, Sunrise Raspberry

Description: Organic Autumn Amber Raspberries are a thornless variety that is very resistant to soil-borne diseases. Simple to grow and quite impressive in the amount the produce.
Foliage: Green leaves, brown canes (2nd year growth), Green canes (1st Year growth).
USDA Zones: USDA Zones 2a to 8a
Fruit: Very large, stable, conically built; the beautiful, apricot color and also the flavor is surprising when fully ripe, so wait until the fruits turn from yellow to slightly apricot for the best taste.
Fruit Color: Yellow, or Orange/Yellow like an Apricot.
Water: Raspberries need lots of water when establishing, and once established, can tolerate times of high stress when water is scarce. Plan on 3 to 6 inches of water a week for the first 2 weeks, and half that much thereafter.
Sun: All raspberries prefer full sun; however, they do tolerate dappled and light shade. Your fruiting will be compromised if too much shade is given.
Soil: Loose, organic rich humus, add sand if needed to help lighten planting area. Raspberries tolerate sand or clay soils, providing the soil drains well. In wet, soggy soils, the roots can rot within a few days. Compost or manure improves texture and drainage, but if the soil is very wet, install raised beds or drainage pipes.
Soil pH: 5.2 – 6.7. All Raspberry plants appreciate a more acidic soil; this is closer to their native environment and will help support the highest fruiting you can get.
Cultivation: Plant raspberries in an area that receives good sun and is sheltered from the wind.
Spacing: Space the plants 30 inches apart and plant them 1 inches to 2 inches deeper than they were growing before. Space the rows 6 feet apart.
Care: At planting time, drive heavy stakes into the ground and string two rows of strong wire between the stakes. As the plants grow, their canes will be supported in these wires. Keep the plants fairly moist, especially during the time when the fruit is ripening. Fertilize with compost or, if you must, 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring using 1 lb. per 100 sq. ft. Mulching is important throughout the season to conserve moisture and suffocate weeds. Keep a thick layer of mulch surrounding plants at all times. Water one inch per week from spring until after harvest. Regular watering is better than deep soaking. The roots send up an abundant number of shoots, called canes. Keep order by pruning away the majority of them, so that the survivors can produce lots of berries.
Trellising: Everbearing raspberries tend to bend over from the weight of the fruit. They benefit from some type of support. Create a simple ‘T’ trellis at knee height with a top 1-1/2-foot-wide to support the canes. This can be made using wood with twine or wire.
Pruning: All raspberries will need pruning annually! It is very important to understand the terms used to describe various parts of a raspberry plant before attempting to prune raspberries. Raspberry canes are best described and identified using two different terms; specifically, primocanes and floricanes. Primocanes are first year canes, characterized by rapid growth and expansion from the crown of the plant or ground nearby, while floricanes are second-year fruiting canes. Summer red raspberries should be pruned twice a year, first in the spring and immediately after harvest. Each spring select 5 or 6 of the most vigorous new canes and cut them back to 30 inches tall. All other NEW canes can be removed. The spring pruning, in late March or early April, consists of removing all weak canes and cutting back tall canes (over 5 feet) to 4.5 to 5 feet. The second pruning consists of the removal of canes that produced fruits, right after harvest.
Harvesting: In the morning after dew has dried will result in a longer shelf-life. When ripe, the berry will detach easily. Put in shallow containers to avoid crushing and move out of the sun. Avoid extra handling of the berries. Sunscald causes the berries to become bleached looking, but the fruit is still edible. Do not wash berries until ready to use them. The storage life of red raspberries when refrigerated is about 2–3 days.
Discussion: Raspberry is woody plant that belongs to the family of roses. It originates from Turkey, but it can be found in areas with temperate climate around the world today. There are around 200 species of raspberries, but only few species are cultivated and consumed on a large scale. Raspberry grows in areas with mild winter and cold summers, on a fertile, well-drained soil. People cultivate raspberry as a source of food and in medical purposes. There are two kinds of raspberries. Single-bearing produce one large crop every year on canes that were produced the year before. Prune these types of raspberries after fruiting in late summer by cutting out the older canes and leaving the new canes. Everbearing raspberries produce a summer crop on old canes from the previous year and a fall crop on new canes. The fall crop may occasionally be damaged by early frosts. Prune everbearing varieties in fall, winter, or early spring by removing two-year-old canes entirely and pruning one-year-old canes back one-third. On both types of raspberries, remove weak growth and suckers that have strayed too far from the supports.
Wildlife: Raspberries support a wide array of wildlife, form being a food and shelter source, or helping stabilize the soils in cut areas, to reintroduction of pioneer species in areas lost to development.

Materials: 25 Organic Autumn Amber Raspberry