Organic Bigleaf Magnolia Seeds - Largest Tree Flowers, Stunning Tree

Organic Bigleaf Magnolia Seeds - Largest Tree Flowers, Stunning Tree

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$5.99
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$5.99

Bigleaf Magnolia
Magnolia macrophylla
Big-bloom, bigleaf magnolia, cowcumber, cucumber, cucumbertree, elkbark, great-leaved magnolia, large-leaf cucumbertree, large-leaf magnolia, longleaf cucumber, long-leaved magnolia, mountain magnolia, pyramid magnolia, royal-oread, silverleaf, silverleaf magnolia, southern cucumbertree, umbrella-tree, large-leaved umbrella-tree, white cucumbertree
Description: The tree with the largest flowers and the largest leaves of all native North American species (except for tropical palms) and a broad, rounded crown of stout, spreading branches. This magnolia is appropriate named as the leaves can reach a length of 32 inches. Such large leaves give the tree a coarse texture and present an interesting litter problem in the fall. The fragrant, white flowers can be 12 inches in diameters.
Height: 30-40' (9-12 m).
Diameter: 1 1/2' (0.5 m).
Leaves: 15-30" (38-76 cm) long, 6-10" (15-25 cm) wide. Reverse ovate, broadest beyond middle, mostly blunt at tip; notched with 2 rounded lobes at base; not toothed. Bright green above, with silvery hairs beneath. Stout, hairy leafstalks, 3-4" (7.5-10 cm) long.
Bark: Light gray; smooth, thin.
Twigs: Stout, hairy; with large leaf-scars at nodes and ending in large buds covered with white hairs.
Flowers: 10-12" (25-30 cm) wide; cup-shaped with 6 white petals with spot at base; fragrant; in late spring and early summer.
Fruit: 2 1/2-3" (6-7.5 cm) long; cone like; elliptical or nearly round; rose-red; composed of many separate short-pointed 2-seeded hairy fruits; maturing in autumn.
Habitat: Moist soil of valleys, especially ravines; in understory of hardwood forests.
Ecology: Bigleaf magnolia is an occasional tree usually in the understory of rich mesic woods, but occasionally as a tall overstory tree. Bigleaf magnolia, along with Fraser and umbrella magnolias, is an indicator species of rich mesic sites. It is shade tolerant, and very tolerant of drought.
Range: C. Vermont south to w. Florida and west to W. Texas; local in S. Ohio, NE. Arkansas, and SE. South Carolina.
Life History: Bigleaf magnolia flowers in early summer and bears fruits in fall. Its life history characters are similar to those of other magnolias (see cucumbertree), however, it lives more than 100 years, and most individuals live no more than 150 years.
Discussion: Planted as an ornamental north to Massachusetts. The "queenliest of all the deciduous magnolias" was named by the French naturalist and explorer Andre Michaux (1746-1802), who discovered this rare local tree near Charlotte, North Carolina in 1789. This North American native tree is deciduous in
most areas but semi-evergreen in the Deep South. Bigleaf Magnolia grows slowly to 30 to 40 feet and spreads 20 to 25 feet forming a rounded, broad canopy. The leaves of Bigleaf Magnolia are truly large, 12 to 32 inches long and 7 to 12 inches wide, when found in the wild and somewhat smaller when grown in landscapes. These leaves are bright green above with a fuzzy, silver/gray underside, creating a beautiful, two-toned effect with each passing breeze. From May to July the showy, fragrant blossoms appear, each 8 to 12-inch-wide, ivory-colored bloom having a slight rose tint at its base. These blooms are followed by the production of 2.5 to 3-inch-long, hairy, red, egg-shaped fruits

Materials: 15 Organic Bigleaf Magnolia Seeds