Organic Caraway Seed-25 Count. An easy to grow diverse spice/seasoning that is used in many cuisines worldwide. Grows in all USDA Zones

Organic Caraway Seed-25 Count. An easy to grow diverse spice/seasoning that is used in many cuisines worldwide. Grows in all USDA Zones

Regular price
$5.99
Sale price
$5.99

Organic Caraway - 25 Count
Carum carvi
Kommen, Alcaravea, Caraway, Wild cumin, Carvies, Carroway, Karwij, Wilde komijn, Kummel

Description: A hardy, biennial herb which is native to Europe and Western Asia. First year plants resemble carrots, growing to about 8 inches tall with finely divided leaves and long taproots. By the second year, two to three foot stalks develop topped by umbels of white or pink flowers, which appear from May to August. Some varieties may flower the first year. The seeds are small, brown and crescent shaped.
Origin: Central Europe to Asia; it is not clear, however, whether caraway is truly indigenous to Europe. Today, it is chiefly cultivated in Finland, the Netherlands, Eastern Europe and Germany, furthermore North Africa, particularly Egypt.
Planting: Caraway grows best in full sun, in a well-drained soil which is high in organic matter with a pH of 6. 0 to 7. 5. Seed can be sown in spring or early autumn. Caraway should always be direct seeded as seedlings do not transplant well. Fall planted caraway will often produce seed the following summer. Sow seed about a half inch deep and thin seedlings to a final stand of six to eight inches apart. Space rows to accommodate cultivation equipment. Four to eight pounds of seed will plant an acre, depending on row spacing. The seed is slow to germinate, making weed control important during the seedling stage. Shallow cultivation is recommended. Since seed will not be produced until the second season, caraway is often intercropped with annuals such as beans or peas or grown with a cover crop.
Cultural Practices: Provide a regular supply of water through drip or overhead irrigation. Use shallow cultivation several times during the growing season to control weeds. Fortunately, Caraway is usually unaffected by insects. To help prevent foliar diseases, keep the foliage as dry as possible by watering early in the day so the foliage dries quickly or by using drip irrigation. To reduce disease and insect problems, rotate caraway to different parts of the field each planting and destroy all plant debris after harvest.
Seed Harvest: To minimize the loss of seeds, harvest plants as soon as the seeds begin to turn dark and ripen. This will occur from June to August of the second year. Large producers may use combines to harvest the seeds. Small producers usually cut the plants with hand shears, scythe or knife, make small bunches of plants and hang them upside down until the seeds are dry.
Discussion: Caraway is often recognized the the most typical spice of the German-speaking countries. It is an ancient spice of Central Europe: Caraway fruits have indeed been found in neolithic villages (though that does only prove that the plant grew there, not that caraway was actually utilized), and since Roman times there is plenty of documentation for numerous culinary and medicinal application – not least to mention caraway-flavored liquor, known as kummel in the USA, that is mostly produced and consumed in Northern Germany and Scandinavia (akvavit). Although caraway is a common plant of Alpine meadows at low elevation, it was grown systematically in medieval monasteries, mainly to to its extremely effective antiflatulent powers; there is still some domestic production of caraway in Germany, although most now stems from Egyptian imports.
Uses - The entire caraway plant is edible. The roots may be boiled and treated like cooked parsnips or carrots. The young leaves can be used in salads or for seasoning soups and stews. The licorice-flavored seeds give rye bread its characteristic taste but are also good in potato soup, cheese spreads, sauerkraut and salad dressings. Several liqueurs are made with caraway, including Kummel and some Schnapps. The seeds and their oil are also used in a number of medicinal preparations for treating disorders such as rheumatism, eye infections, and toothaches. The main constituents of caraway seed oil are carvone and limonene which have been reported to be potential cancer chemo preventative agents. The oil is also used as a fragrance component in cosmetic preparations including soaps, creams, lotions and perfumes.

Materials: 25 Organic Caraway Seeds