Organic Coral Honeysuckle Seeds - Beautiful Color, Gorgeous Plant

Organic Coral Honeysuckle Seeds - Beautiful Color, Gorgeous Plant

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$5.99
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$5.99

Coral Honeysuckle
Caprifoliaceae
Southern Honeysuckle, Trumpet Honeysuckle

Description: Coral honeysuckle is a twining or trailing woody vine that is evergreen or tardily deciduous in mild climates. The smooth leaves are 1-3 in (2.5-7.6 cm) long and arranged opposite each other along the stem. The last two leaves at the ends of new growth are joined at their bases, cup-like around the stem and the showy flowers are in terminal clusters just beyond. The flowers are tube shaped about 2 in (5.1 cm) long, coral red or bright orange on the outside and yellow on the inside. The fruits are orange red berries, about 0.25 in (0.6 cm) diameter. Numerous cultivars are available commercially including one with bright yellow flowers.
Flowers: Coral honeysuckle flowers seem to be custom designed for hummingbirds both in shape and arrangement - no hummingbird can help but be enchanted with this beautiful vine as will you. Click to download a large version of this image.
Structure: Trailing and twining woody vine with branches to several m long.
Stems Smooth, tan, becoming gray with shredding bark, sometimes with adventitious roots at the nodes of branches touching moist soil.
Leaves Opposite, pale- to dark green above, somewhat gray-green below, glabrous, elliptic to obviate, 5-12 cm (2-4.7 in) long and 2-6 cm (0.8-2.4 in) wide, sessile. The uppermost pair perfoliate, forming an oblong structure subtending the inflorescence.
Inflorescence A terminal pair of 3-flowered sessile cymules.
Location: Coral honeysuckle grows wild in open woodlands, roadsides, fence rows and the edges of clearings, from Connecticut to Nebraska, and south to Texas and Florida.
Culture: Prune coral honeysuckle back in the winter to increase flowering. Don't over-fertilize.
Light: Prefers full sun, but tolerates partial sun.
Moisture: Drought tolerant.
Hardiness: USDA Zone 4 - 10.
Propagation: By seed.
Usage: Coral honeysuckle thrives in containers or in the garden. It is easy to grow, and its flashy flowers will attract ruby-throated hummingbirds and butterflies all summer long. Let it clamber over a fence or give it a trellis of its own. Many gardeners allow coral honeysuckle to climb over shrubs. Unlike its weedy relative, Japanese honeysuckle (L. japonica), coral honeysuckle will not spread out of control, and its sparse vines won't strangle your prize shrubs.
Features: Wherever coral honeysuckle grows, ruby-throated hummingbirds and butterflies will find it. Songbirds relish the juicy fruits. Coral honeysuckle berries appear in late summer and fall to serve as a juicy food source for birds and other wildlife.
Growing Your Honeysuckle Plants: Honeysuckle prefers full sun, but will tolerate partial sun, and even some light, afternoon shade. Once established, Honeysuckle needs only moderate watering, unless the summer is very dry. If the planting area is properly prepared and mulched, your Honeysuckle will be satisfied with a light annual application of a balanced fertilizer (10-10-10) at the beginning of the growing season and then once again in the middle of the blooming season. They are usually sold in 1-gal. containers beginning in early spring.
Honeysuckle should be planted in early spring, as soon as frost danger has passed. Prepare the planting area as for any perennial and set the plants a minimum of two to three apart. (2 feet if you are using them as a ground cover) Water the plants thoroughly, and follow up with repeated soakings until the plant shows signs of new growth. Mulch the plant with heavy cover of leaves, to protect the roots from freezing as well as to conserve moisture in the summer. When your plant has finished blooming, you can prune for shape. (Only lightly prune plants until they are well established at about 2 years old)
If your Honeysuckle is to be grown on a trellis or an arbor, put it in place before planting, to avoid damaging your vine. Then plant your Honeysuckle 6-12 in. away from the support to allow enough growing room for developing stems. The vines should be tied to their support using strong, stretchy materials that won't cut into growing branches. Strips of old nylon hosiery work very well for this. Loop each tie into a figure 8, with the crossed portion between the stem and the support to keep stems from rubbing or being choked.

Materials: 15 Organic Coral Honeysuckle Seeds