Organic Little Baby Watermelon Seeds - Produces Petite Fruits, Sweet Flavor - 10 Seeds

Organic Little Baby Watermelon Seeds - Produces Petite Fruits, Sweet Flavor - 10 Seeds

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$5.99
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Organic Little Baby Watermelon Seeds
Citrullus lanatus
Description: Organic Little Baby watermelon produces petite, fully-formed and very sweet watermelons averaging around 6 to 8 pounds per fruit, with numerous fruits per plant. The flesh is bright red, lightly lined with pink, few – if any – seeds, and a thin, easy to work with rind.
Days to Maturity: 65-80 Days
Fruit: The flesh is bright red and very sweet.
Fruit Size: Up to 8 to 10 inches in length, 6 to 8 inches in diameter
Fruit Color: Bright green skin with deliciously red flesh, very sweet.
USDA Zones: 2b – 11b (At elevation Zones 3b – 11b)
Life: Annual
Soil: Loose, loamy, amended with compost, slightly sandy. The better the soil, the better the Watermelon. Mulching with dark/black material to cover the soil will serve multiple purposes: it will warm the soil, hinder weed growth and keep developing fruits clean.
Soil pH: 6.0 to 6.8
Sun: Full sun, no shade.
Sowing: If you live in warmer climes, you can direct sow seeds outdoors, but wait until the soil temperature warms to at least 70 degrees F to avoid poor germination and losses. Watermelon vines are exceptionally tender and should not be transplanted until all danger of frost has passed. To be safe, wait at least two weeks past your absolute last frost date. [Gardeners in colder climates can still have success in growing watermelon by starting seeds indoors.] Even a very light frost (31 to 33ºF) can kill watermelon vines. Use frost blankets or cold frames to protect vines and prolong the harvest season. To ensure fruits ripen before frost, remove any blossoms that start to develop within 50 days of your area’s average first frost date.
Fertilizing: Compost is the best for all watermelons, but, if you use commercial fertilizer, make sure it’s deliver more nitrogen than phosphorus and potassium. However, after flowering begins, use a fertilizer with less nitrogen. We prefer to use home-processed seaweed in our watermelon patch.
Wildlife: Watermelons love bees, bees are good, don’t hate bees!
Spacing: Space the watermelons 3 feet between rows, and 2.5 feet between plants. If growing in mound/hill style, sow seed around the perimeter of mound/hill.
Water: Water regularly, 2 or more times a day for proper growth; plan on 1 to 2 inches per plant/per week. If in drought conditions, make sure to monitor water application to support during times of stress.
Harvesting: When a melon is ripe, its belly will go from near white to creamy yellow. Check the tendril. If it’s green, wait. If it’s half-dead, the watermelon is nearly ripe or ripe. If the tendril is fully dead, it’s ripe or overripe; it’s not going to get any riper, now is the time to pick the fruits of your labor! Stems should be cut with a sharp knife close to the fruit.
Nutrients: Watermelon fruit is 93% water, contains 5-6% sugars, and is low in fat. In a 100-gram serving, watermelon fruit supplies 30 calories and low amounts of essential nutrients. Only vitamin C is present in appreciable content at 10% of the Daily Value. Watermelon pulp contains carotenoids, including lycopene. The amino acid citrulline is produced in watermelon rind. Watermelons are mostly water — about 92 percent — but this refreshing fruit is soaked with nutrients. Each serving has significant levels of vitamins A, B6 and C, and more lycopene than found in many tomato varieties, antioxidants and amino acids. There's even a modest amount of potassium.
Storage: Watermelon may be stored on the countertop, but will last longer – uncut, in the refrigerator. However, studies have shown that watermelons stored in the refrigerator will have a nutrient reduction versus ones stored on the countertop.
Additional Information: Vines produce male and female flowers separately on the same plant. They often begin producing male flowers several weeks before the females appear. Do not be concerned if the male flowers fall off. The female flowers (which have a swollen bulb at the base) will stay on the vine and bear fruit.
History: Watermelon is thought to have originated in the Kalahari Desert of Africa. The first recorded watermelon harvest occurred nearly 5,000 years ago in Egypt and is depicted in Egyptian hieroglyphics on walls of their ancient buildings. ... The 13th century found watermelon spread through the rest of Europe via the Moors.

Materials: 10 Organic Little Baby Watermelon Seeds