Organic Northern Catalpa Tree Seeds - Beautiful Large Showy Flowers, Heart Shaped Leaves!

Organic Northern Catalpa Tree Seeds - Beautiful Large Showy Flowers, Heart Shaped Leaves!

Regular price
$6.99
Sale price
$6.99

Northern Catalpa
Catalpa speciosa
Cigar Tree, Indian Bean Tree, Johnny Smoker Tree, Moth Tree, Fishing Bait Tree
Description: Tree with rounded crown of spreading branches; large, heart-shaped leaves; large, showy flowers; and long, beanlike fruit.
Height: 50-80' (15-24 m).
Diameter: 2 1/2' (0.8 m).
Leaves: 3 at a node (whorled) and opposite; 6-12" (15-30 cm) long, 4-8" (10-20 cm) wide. Ovate, long-pointed, straight to notched at base; without teeth. Dull green above, paler and covered with soft hairs beneath; turning blackish in autumn. Slender leafstalk 4-6" (10-15 cm) long.
Bark: Brownish-gray; smooth, becoming furrowed into scaly plates or ridges.
Twigs: Green, turning brown; stout; becoming hairless.
Flowers: 2-2 1/4" (5-6 cm) long and wide; with bell-shaped corolla of 5 unequal rounded fringed lobes, white with 2 orange stripes and purple spots and lines inside; in branched upright clusters, 5-8" (13-20 cm) long and wide; in late spring.
Fruit: 8-18" (20-46 cm) long, 1/2-5/8" (12-15 mm) in diameter; narrow, cylindrical, dark brown capsule; cigarlike, thick-walled, splitting into 2 parts; many flat light brown seeds with 2 papery wings; maturing in autumn, remaining attached in winter.
Habitat: Moist valley soils by streams; naturalized in open areas such as roadsides and clearings.
Germination: Germination is achieved at an almost 98 percent success rate. Standard potting techniques allow this tree to be propagated by the most novice gardener. If wishing to plant in the wild, cover with soil at a depth of ¼ inch and saturate with water then water regularly for the fist few weeks.
Range: Original range uncertain; native apparently from SW. Indiana to NE. Arkansas; widely naturalized in se. United States; at 200-500' (61-152 m).
Discussion: Northern Catalpa is the northernmost New World example of its tropical family and is hardier than Southern Catalpa, which blooms later and has slightly smaller flowers and narrower, thinner-walled capsules. Both are called "Cigartree" and "Indian-bean" because of the distinctive fruit.
Botanical Source: This handsome tree has leaves that are large, heart-shaped, opposite or disposed in whorls of 3. The flowers appear in June and July, and are produced in large, showy, terminal, compound panicles. The corollas are about an inch long, white, tinged with purple, and studded with orange spots in the tubes. They are bell-shaped, with a swollen tube, irregularly 5-lobed and 2-lipped. The fruit is a slender, 2-celled capsule, about 1 foot long, 1/4 of an inch thick, and hangs suspended until spring. The seeds are numerous and winged.
History: This tree is a native of the southern United States, but is cultivated as an ornamental tree and frequently naturalized in the northern states. It belongs to the natural order Bignoniaceae, and, except a western states species, the Catalpa speciosa of Warder, is the only indigenous species of Catalpa, although others are found in Asia and the West Indies. The tree is called "cigar-tree," or "bean-tree," names derived from the slender fruit. The fruit and seeds have also been used.
Description: The bark of the trunk is scaly, brown, and from 3 to 6 lines in thickness. That of the young limbs, is smooth, dark-grayish, and spotted with lighter colored excrescences. The young bark, and the inner portion of the old, is bitter. Catalpa wood is very durable, rivaling cedar. It is hard, grayish, and of coarse fiber.

Materials: 25 Organic Northern Catalpa Tree Seeds