Organic Pink Anise Hyssop-25 Seeds-Mainly grown for its flowers and beauty in containers, works wonderfully when cooking as well!

Organic Pink Anise Hyssop-25 Seeds-Mainly grown for its flowers and beauty in containers, works wonderfully when cooking as well!

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$7.49
Sale price
$7.49

Organic Pink Anise Hyssop - 25 Seeds
Hyssopus officinalis var. Agastache foeniculum

Description: As its common name suggests, anise hyssop (Agastache foe­niculum ) smells and tastes of anise, a cousin of licorice. The plant resembles lavender in terms of flower shape and color, as well as in height and spread. The leaves reveal its heritage as a mint family member. Anise hyssop grows in USDA zones 6 to 10
USDA Zones: 6a – 10
Life-cycle: Hardy Perennial
Form: Much lower growing then common Hyssop.
Flower Color: Deep Purple
Exposure: Full sun, tolerates minimal shade.
Growing Locations: Indoors and out. Works well as a potted plant, also as a greenhouse planting. This may be grown indoors throughout the winter months for all year use. Many grow year round for teas, cooking, potpourri, soap-making, candle-making, and aromatics.
Soil: Dry, well-drained soil.
Parts of plant to use for tea: Green tops of the herbs for best tea.
Taste: Minty, slightly bitter taste.
Growing Directions: Whether home is an apartment with room for a few pots, a townhouse with a deck or small flower bed, or a suburban house with a yard, you can enjoy an herbal tea garden. Most herbal annuals, biennials, and perennials thrive in full sun, but some like partial sun or even shade. Generally, herbs tolerate not-too-rich soil, little or no fertilizer, and only moderate amounts of water. All you need to get started are herb plants of your choice, some easily worked soil with a fairly neutral pH, and -- if you are gardening in containers -- pots that have holes in the bottoms for good drainage. For pot planting, buy a quality sterile planting mix. If your garden soil isn't crumbly, mix in peat moss, compost, or leaf mold equal to approximately one-third the volume of your garden soil. Make sure your planting area drains well.
Herbs suggested for containers also will do well in the garden. When temperatures begin to dip, however, potted tender perennials can be taken indoors without the shock of being transplanted, and they'll continue to thrive on sunny indoor windowsills.
Aromatic oils are most concentrated when herb plants are in bud, so that's a good time to harvest, although you can certainly take cuttings here and there during the growing season. Cut back the entire plant by two thirds. In my region, you can get about 3-6 cuttings during growing season, and many more if grown year round.
Direction for tea: Sadly, too many gardeners fail to take advantage of the many delightful herbal teas available to them from their own garden. Herbal teas are healthy, refreshing and can be sweetened to taste with honey or dried licorice root.
Brewing herbal teas is very simple. We recommend using the infusing method, that is pouring boiling water over the herbs and allowing them to steep for 3-5 minutes, then straining the tea and serve. Teas can be served cold or hot, according to preference.
Making the perfect tea is a personal preference, we recommend using the following guidelines starting out:
For one cup of herbal tea, use 3 teaspoons of fresh herbs, or 1 teaspoon of dried herbs. For one gallon, use 6 ounces (about 2+ cups) of fresh herbs, or + cups dried herbs. If using fresh herbs, gently bruise or crush the leaves, flowers, stems, or root to help release flavor and aroma. Never let the herbs set in the tea for over a day as this may allow tannic acid to release into the tea, which can be irritating to the stomach.
Be sure to use only herbs that you have not treated with pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides. Also remember to clean the herbs prior to use.

Materials: 25 Organic Pink Anise Hyssop Seeds