Organic Waltham Butternut Winter Squash Seeds - 12 Seeds

Organic Waltham Butternut Winter Squash Seeds - 12 Seeds

Regular price
$5.99
Sale price
$5.99

Waltham Butternut Winter Squash Seeds
Cucurbita moschata
Description: Bob Young of Waltham, Massachusetts patiently cultivated this squash for years; his efforts resulted in a squash of uniform shape and a hard rind that keeps exceptionally well. Introduced commercially in 1977, it became an AAS Award winner in 1970 and continues to set the standard in butternut squash.
Other Common Names:
Duration: Annual
Days to Maturity: 100
Seeds Per Oz: 380
Height: 12” to 18”
Spacing: 48 in to 72 in
Planting: Direct sow outside after danger of last frost. Plant seeds about one-inch deep and 2 to 3 feet apart in a traditional garden bed., and 1 inch below soil surface.
Feeding: Squash plants are heavy feeders. Work compost and plenty of organic matter into the soil before planting for a rich soil base. To germinate outside, use cloche or frame protection in cold climates for the first few weeks.
Water: Water deeply. A steady water supply is necessary for the best quality fruit. Water deeply once a week, applying at least one inch of water. Shallow watering promotes shallow root development that is detrimental to yields. Don't judge the moisture content of the soil by the dryness of the surface, if the soil is dry four inches down, water. If the soil is moist at that depth, the plants will be fine. Wilting in scorching, mid-afternoon sun is normal for summer squash. They will recover when the sun goes down.
Insects and Diseases: The major insect pests that attack summer squash include cucumber beetles, vine borers, and squash bugs. Cucumber beetles can cause the most damage, particularly to seedlings, and carry wilt disease from plant to plant. Vine borers can also wipe out your plants. A floating row cover placed immediately over emerging or transplanted seedlings, will decrease cucumber beetle and borer damage by keeping moths from laying eggs on the plants. Be sure to remove the cover when plants blossom, however, to allow pollination. Applications of pyrethrum or rotenone will also significantly reduce pest damage. Dusting the plants with wood ashes, covering the stems and base of each plant, will discourage pests as well. If you notice squash plants wilting in the morning or evening, vine borers have probably infiltrated the plants. Check for piles of 'sawdust' at the base of the plants. Some gardeners slice the stems open to remove the borers, however, the damage is often done and the squash will no longer produce well. It's easier to rip out the plant and sow anew. The new plants will emerge after the borers have moved on, and your squash production will not be effected later in the summer.
Sowing: Sow the seeds one-inch deep, spacing the plantings about 18 to 30 inches apart in the bed, depending on the variety. Follow seed packet instructions. Allow plenty of growing space for vining types. Where space is limited, grow only the bush varieties.
Harvesting: Here are two things to keep in mind when you harvest squash. Cut the fruits from the vine carefully. Using a paring knife or garden shears, cut the stem about an inch above the fruit. Don't try to twist or yank the squash as you could rip the skin or damage the plant.
Seed Saving: Allow squash to ripen on plants; then collect seeds. Clean and dry the seeds before storage in cool dry conditions.

Materials: Organic Waltham Butternut Winter Squash Seeds