Silky Swamp Dogwood Seeds - Gorgeous Dogwood Tree, Beautiful Flowers

Silky Swamp Dogwood Seeds - Gorgeous Dogwood Tree, Beautiful Flowers

Regular price
$5.99
Sale price
$5.99

Swamp Dogwood
Cornus amomum
Kinnikinnik Tree, Swamp Dogwood, Silky Dogwood, Light Dogwood, Willow Dogwood, Silky Cornel, Indian Pipe Tree
Leaves: Broadly egg-shaped, with rounded bases and 3-5 pairs of veins, 2-4" long. Leaves roll up when dead.
Twigs: Purplish to maroon, silky, with silky hairs on branch tips as well. Many stems join at one common point.
Berries Dark blue, in umbrella-shaped clusters.
Fruits: August - October.
Flowers White or whitish, also in umbrella-shaped clusters. Flowering between June - July.
Leaves: The opposite, simple, elliptic to ovate leaves are 4-10 cm. (2-4 in.) long, and lanceolate to elliptic with a tapering point. The wavy margin is entire. The upper surface is pubescent, while the lower surface has appressed trichomes (flattened hairs).
Height: To 10' sometimes to 20’, depending on water, nutrients, and sunlight.
Wildlife Benefits: Fruits are consumed by a variety of birds. Foliage is browsed by deer.
Habitat: Open areas near water. Found along swamps and stream banks in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and mountains.
Range: Southern New England to Georgia, west to New Mexico. Native to most of the US.
Connections: Swamp dogwood has also been called Kinnikinnik by Midwestern Indian tribes. The name refers to a mixture of tobacco and bearberry leaves and swamp dogwood bark that members of those tribes smoked.
Discussion: If you plant a silky dogwood, don’t expect to see the same sort of big white showy bracts you’d get with flowering dogwood (Cornus florida). Instead, you can look forward to a bloom that is much more delicate and understated. The individual flowers are tiny, each with a rosy center and four dainty, creamy petals, and they are carried in airy, flat-topped clusters that measure about 2" across. Appearing in May and June, the light, lacy blooms may never be overwhelming, but they are always subtly and refreshingly pretty.
The flowers are followed by clusters of blue or blue-and-cream-spotted, berry-like drupes, which ripen in August and September and are really quite interesting and ornamental while they last. That isn’t very long, though, because the birds are crazy about them. Bluebirds, cardinals, blue jays, robins, red-headed woodpeckers, evening grosbeaks, mockingbirds, summer tanagers, brown thrashers, gray-cheeked thrushes, and cedar waxwings are among this popular fruit’s biggest fans.
Silky dogwood is a wetland species and is most at home on a stream bank or swamp’s edge in partial shade. Massed along a stream, creek, or pond, it makes a beautiful and useful addition to the wildlife garden. Transplanting is easy, and poorly drained, heavy clay soils are not a problem.

Materials: 20 Silky Swamp Dogwood Seeds